Service to mark battle’s anniversary

20150920- Black Watch banner rededication at Glamis War Memorial. 'William Tindal whose uncle Cpl. Alex Scott is listed on the memorial for the fallen lay the wreath. 'The event was attended by Angus Provost Helen Oswald, Lord Lieutenant of Angus Georgina Osborne, guests and members of the Black Watch Association. 'Pictured Brian Smith, William Tindal, Jock Paton and Pipe Major Alistair Duthie. ''Copyright Andy Thompson Photography / ATIMAGES ''No use without payment.
20150920- Black Watch banner rededication at Glamis War Memorial. 'William Tindal whose uncle Cpl. Alex Scott is listed on the memorial for the fallen lay the wreath. 'The event was attended by Angus Provost Helen Oswald, Lord Lieutenant of Angus Georgina Osborne, guests and members of the Black Watch Association. 'Pictured Brian Smith, William Tindal, Jock Paton and Pipe Major Alistair Duthie. ''Copyright Andy Thompson Photography / ATIMAGES ''No use without payment.

A special service was held in Glamis on Sunday to

mark the 100th anniversary of The Battle of

Loos.

The battle, which took place on September 25, 1915, was the largest land battle in British military history and is recognised as one of the most intense and bloody battles of the First World War.

To mark its anniversary a service was held at Glamis Parish Church before The Black Watch Angus Branch standard was rededicated at the village war memorial.

Helen Oswald, the Provost of Angus and Georgiana Osborne, Lord-Lieutenant of Angus, were among those who attended.

William Tindal, whose uncle Corporal Alex Scott is listed on the memorial for the fallen, laid a wreath during the ceremony at the war memorial.

Among those from Glamis remembered was Captain Fergus Bowes-Lyon who was born at Glamis Castle; he was the older brother of the late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. He left behind a new wife to serve with the 8th Battalion, The Black Watch.

He lost his life in the early part of the Battle of Loos, which brought the regiment’s darkest day at the cost of more than 1100 men who wore the Red Hackle. He is buried in the quarry at Vermelles in northern France.

The Black Watch were involved in an attack on a warren of trenches known as the Hohenzollern Redoubt, but initial success was stalled by fierce German resistance.

Describing the significant loss of men during the battle Major Ronnie Proctor, branch association chairman said: “Every Scottish infantry regiment took part in the battle.

“For example, the 4th Battalion from Dundee suffered very heavy losses.

“Out of 20 officers only one survived. Of 420 men, 230 were killed or wounded.”