NHS dementia DVD launched

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A NEW DVD aimed at people who have recently been diagnosed with dementia has been launched by NHS Health Scotland.

With approximately 82,000 people in Scotland living with dementia - including around 3500 who are under 65 - it is a condition that also directly affects the lives of partners, family members and friends who provide care and support.

The number of people with dementia is expected to rise to 164,000 by 2036.

The DVD, ‘Living well with dementia’ was produced by NHS Health Scotland in partnership with Alzheimer Scotland and the Scottish Dementia Working Group, an independent group run by people with dementia. It is aimed at people who have recently been given a diagnosis of dementia and their carers.

The DVD is based on the experiences of people with dementia and carers, using their voices to help people in the early stages of diagnosis understand more about their illness, share experience around how to ‘live well’ after a diagnosis of dementia as well as offering practical advice on coping with its effects. It also suggests where people with dementia and their carers can go for further support.

Margaret Burns, chair of NHS Health Scotland, said: “This new DVD has been developed for people who have recently been given a diagnosis of dementia. It features people with dementia and their carers who explain how they cope with this illness - emotionally and practically - and how to live well after diagnosis.”

The DVD which lasts for approximately 35 minutes is split into four chapters to give viewers the freedom to watch from start to finish or to select specific content at the appropriate time.

Free copies will be distributed widely to people with dementia and their families across Scotland through every NHS Health Board, Alzheimer Scotland and other partners.

Individual copies are available from www.healthscotland.com and the Alzheimer Scotland helpline on 0800 808 3000.

The DVD can also be viewed on the NHS Scotland YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/nhshealthscotland