DCSIMG

Parking is domain of police says council

Parking incident on Castle Street last week.

Parking incident on Castle Street last week.

Angus Council has this week confirmed that the incidents of inconsiderate parking reported in last week’s Dispatch are in fact a police issue, if those incidents are instances of dangerous parking.

This comes after another week in which our social media channels and submitted letters were dominated by Forfar residents complaining about issues they have been facing around the town since the decriminalisation of parking began.

The law in question, Section 22 of the Road Traffic Act 1988, Part I - Principal Safety Provisions, states: “If a person in charge of a vehicle causes or permits the vehicle or a trailer drawn by it to remain at rest on a road in such a position or in such condition or in such circumstances as to involve a danger of injury to other persons using the road, he is guilty of an offence.”

Our Facebook page received a defence of the occurrence pictured in last week’s edition when lorries and buses were left stuck by cars parked on Prior Road, with the offending vehicle believed to belong to a parent enjoying the primary school’s sports day.

Jenna Leggat posted: “Sports day runs once a year,maybe the residents could give parents a break for wanting to share a once a year occasion with their kid. It’s not as if school traffic runs all day,it’s a problem at set times,but regardless of where the school was the problem would be exactly the same.”

A response from Lyndsay Reid said: “If an emergency vehicle was to be coming through that area on said day they would never have been able to pass, always an idiotic parking in that area morning noon and late afternoon what’s wrong with parking in some of the free car parks and walking? It’s the world we live in now, people choose the easy way rather than respecting others and the area!! Annoys me everyday I have to take a detour to work.”

Police Scotland had yet to comment by the time of going to print.

 

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