Kirrie groups knit together

Nine-month-old Brodie Crichton surrounded by jumpers and hats knitted by members of Glens and Kirriemuir Old Parish Church and the knitting group from The wool and Baby Wear Shop.
Nine-month-old Brodie Crichton surrounded by jumpers and hats knitted by members of Glens and Kirriemuir Old Parish Church and the knitting group from The wool and Baby Wear Shop.

THE click of the knitting needles has been heard loud and clear in Kirriemuir recently as hundreds of brightly coloured jumpers have been produced.

Our photographer popped along to the Glens and Kirriemuir Old Parish Church Hall last Friday when local ladies presented the latest batch for the ‘fish and chip’ babies of Africa.

The appeal for jumpers for premature babies has really caught the public’s imagination, with cosy jumpers in all shapes, sizes and colours being produced.

The Kirrie jumpers are being given to Mission International to take out to Africa in September.

The charity operates in Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya as well as India and Haiti.

The local batch of jumpers and hats have been knitted by members of the Glens & Kirriemuir Old Parish Church and the knitting group which meets in the Wool and Baby Shop run by Alan Reid in Kirriemuir.

The church appeal only began at the end of June and the shop one slightly before that, and already 340 jumpers and 300 hats have been handed in.

This is an ongoing project and anyone who would like to join in can collect a pattern from the church office or the wool shop. Anyone with spare wool can hand it in as well.

Warm-hearted Scots have knitted thousands of tiny woolly jumpers to bring some comfort to the lives of the new born babies in Africa.

The initiative was a response to the revelation that so-called ‘fish and chip babies’ were despatched from hospitals wrapped in newspaper because of a shortage of blankets in the poverty stricken African country. Copies of the knitting pattern have been passed among friends, with the request that brightly coloured wool rather than pastels is used as the garments may never be washed.