Inspirational talk at the East and Old

Pictured with the local branch members are, front from left - Jamie McIntosh, Individual Giving Manager with Leprosy Mission Scotland, Babs and Dan Izzett, Rev Barbara Ann Sweetin, local Chairman of the branch and minister of Forfar East & Old Parish Church.

Pictured with the local branch members are, front from left - Jamie McIntosh, Individual Giving Manager with Leprosy Mission Scotland, Babs and Dan Izzett, Rev Barbara Ann Sweetin, local Chairman of the branch and minister of Forfar East & Old Parish Church.

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Forfar branch of Leprosy Mission Scotland was delighted to welcome Dan and Babs Izzett as their guest speakers last week.

Dan and his wife, from Zimbabwe, are on a 10-week tour of Scotland, informing and inspiring people across the country with their Christian message of hope and encouragement.

Dan was a civil engineer in the former Rhodesia, responsible for many of the river dam projects, infected with microbacterium lepra in 1962, but not diagnosed until 1972.

He suffered loss of nerve sensation in his legs and hands, leading to infections and the loss of a leg and damage to his other foot.

He was forced to retire, but then entered full time ministry in 1981, spreading the gospel and helping the Leprosy Mission in its campaign to educate, get earlier diagnosis, gain free treatment for all and remove the suspicion and stigma associated with the disease. Babs was also diagnosed with leprosy but treated immediately and cleared.

Local members who attended at East & Old Parish Church agreed Dan’s talk was moving, effective and inspirational, especially from a sufferer’s standpoint, and gave them a new insight into the Mission’s cause.

Leprosy Mission Scotland is a member of a global partnership bringing healing and justice to people affected by leprosy.

Ultimately they would like to see a world free of the disease and its effects on individuals, families and communities.

There are 600 new cases diagnosed every 24 hours across 115 nations of the world, and four million people have been treated.