Angus fire casualties below five-year average

Deaths and injuries in Angus are down, according to the latest figures.
Deaths and injuries in Angus are down, according to the latest figures.

An Angus fire chief has said that efforts to prevent fire-related casualties are paying off as figures show that deaths and injuries in Angus are lower than the five-year average.

The latest performance report for the county shows that no-one died as a result of fire in Angus during the second quarter of the year. Despite a slight increase in the number of fire casualty numbers during the second quarter, from 5 to 6 compared to last year, the total number of fire casualties for the first six months of 2016/17 is 20 per cent lower than five-year average for the same period.

It also highlights that in the first six months of this year there was a decline in non-domestic fires, with a reduction of six compared to the same period last year.

Colin Grieve, Local Senior Officer (LSO) for Angus, said: “The SFRS vision is to have no fire fatalities/casualties throughout Scotland. We are striving to achieve this through partnership working.

“Crews regularly visit houses and provide free Home Fire Safety Visits which helps to reduce the number of casualties through early detection and intervention.

“That is instrumental in contributing to safer communities.”

House fires and casualties are known to increase during winter, with a high risk over the festive period, and Mr Grieve said crews will be out across Angus highlighting dangers when cooking, using portable heaters and electric blankets.

Although the Angus area has seen a rise in accidental house fire numbers, an increase of 10 compared to the same period last year, he added that long term the evidence shows that the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service and its work with communities is helping keep people safer.

The report states that the number of deliberate secondary fires also continues to fall, reduced by 19 per cent when compared to the five-year average for the same period.

Mr Grieve said: “Our analysis suggests this is a positive outcome of the strong local partnerships we have established, including joint work with council and Police colleagues on initiatives such as the Friday Night Project at Lochside Leisure Centre in Forfar and the long-standing and highly acclaimed Fire Academy.”

Responses to, and attendance at false alarams created by fire alarms is also down slightly, a reduction of five per cent reduction when compared to the five year average for the same period.